Uber boss to meet with trade union for the first time since landmark deal

Uber is meeting with its trade union for the first time since it signed its landmark deal to protect the rights of its workers.

Tens of thousands of Uber drivers are now represented by GMB Union which gives them collective bargaining powers.

Uber suffered a defeat in its case with the UK Supreme Court in May, which deemed the company’s drivers to be workers and therefore giving them the right to holiday pay, a statutory wage and pensions.

“You may think that Uber and the GMB don’t seem like obvious allies but we’ve always agreed that drivers must come first,” Uber’s regional general manager in Northern and Eastern Europe Jamie Heywood said to the Financial Times.

Uber’s UK boss Jamie Heywood and GMB’s Gary Smith will meet to find a resolution to the years of disagreement over the working practises of the company.

READ MORE: Delivery Wars: The Rise of Ultra-Fast Delivery in the UK

Both Uber and GMB released a joint statement before the upcoming meeting which said that around 230,000 of riders were not receiving their legal rights from rival companies Bolt and Addison Lee.

Addison Lee chief executive Liam Griffin hit back, claiming its drivers were “at the heart” of his business.

“We guarantee the drivers that work with us get the London Living Wage level of earnings, as opposed to only the National Minimum Wage paid by Uber,” Griffin added.

“Drivers working with Addison Lee also get access to a pension and holiday pay.”

Bolt also disagreed with the statement saying its drivers were “free to choose which platform they use and record numbers are continuing to earn through Bolt”.

“They tell us that’s because they can take home more money,” it said.

“That’s not exploitation, it’s competition. We don’t take business advice from competitors motivated by their own agenda.”

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